T. +44 (0)20 7484 6430
  • London: +44 (0)20 7484 6430
  • Edinburgh: +44 (0)131 226 4202
  • Hong Kong: +852 3628 3627
0 items
Checkout

Welcome to the new Justerini & Brooks website

Browse our wine lists, explore our portfolio of growers and delve into the world of whisky right here.

Dismiss

Portfolio Producers

Extensive portfolio of over 4,000 wines in stock

The Justerinis Buyers travel annually to family-run domaines, estates and chateaux around the world - Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Loire, Germany and Piedmont to name just a few - in search of these great wines. This takes us to some of the most famous vineyards and the greatest producers. At the same time we also pride ourselves on constantly seeking out the bright winemaking talent and stars of the future.

Portfolio Producers by Region:


Alsace

The ever-burgeoning number of exciting, top quality restaurants flocking to the region of Alsace demonstrates that food in this country is much more sophisticated than it used to be. This has made matching wine with food a far more complicated and, consequently, more enjoyable conundrum than ever before. Whether it's infusing Vietnamese cooking with traditional French cuisine, or manipulating food science to create puddings that taste like breakfasts, there has never been so much fine and unique food on the menu and such an abundance of glorious wine to pair with it.

There are few regions in the world producing wines better suited to this diverse and extraordinary modern offering than those of the sun-blanched slopes of Alsace. They have the longest average hours of sunshine in France, a superb geological cocktail of soil types that are so vital in shaping the character of a wine, and the passionate, unwavering wine growing of producers such as Domaine Weinbach. When combined, these factors reflect the sheer quality and diversity of Alsatian wine.

Portfolio Producers:





Argentina & Chile

"Argentina is the world's fifth-largest wine producer, and for 200 years the Spanish, the Italians and, more recently, the French, have been making wine there. However, a per capita domestic annual consumption of 90 litres had long prevented Argentinean wineries from looking beyond its country's boundaries. Now, with a rash of high-quality plantings of interesting varieties such as Malbec, Cabernet, Bonarda, Tempranillo, Torrontes and Sangiovese, together with a host of fine home and foreign winemaking talent who are heavily investing their time and money, Argentina's potential is being unlocked.

Exports of Chilean wine to the UK have been growing for several years now. Chile still remains the benchmark for reliable, affordable wine and seems to consolidate this position consistently, year after year. Not to be pigeonholed as simply a producer of ‘cheap and cheerfuls’ Chile has started to explore its qualitative potential with great rigour. Many wines from the cooler coastal regions have gained wide recognition for their quality, in particular from the regions of Lleyda and Casablanca. The single varietal wines made from Cabernet Franc, Syrah, Malbec, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon and Chardonnay boast their own individuality and, whilst showing typical varietal characteristics, also exhibit a freshness and complexity rarely found in other Chilean wines and also blend excellently with each other.

Portfolio Producers:





Australia

Australia is a country that has a history of successfully blending multi- regional wines and marketing them intelligently to a wine drinking public that is more concerned with varietals than regions.

However, in stark contrast to France's AOC system - which is under constant scrutiny from marketing men wishing to simplify labels and descriptions - Australians are now pushing for more specific regionality and indeed succeeding. The success of this new regionality will depend on whether the styles are individual enough to make a difference to the consumer, of course. Australia has already tasted success with famous top end areas such Barossa, Coonawarra and Margaret River, together with a small handful of other well-known regions. For these are now well-established, producing wines of quality and individuality, whether it's Barossa and its powerful reds, the mineral curranty Cabernets of Coonawarra, or the cool-climate wines of Margaret River; but can the practice follow all over Australia? As long time advocates of 'terroir', we hope so.

Portfolio Producers:





Austria & Hungary

In the heart of continental Europe lies Austria, a reasonably small wine producing country that is enjoying a period of growth and higher standing amongst wine lovers around the world. The best examples of Austrian wines are found in the heartlands of Wachau, Wagram and Kremstal, all in Niederosterreich; the largest wine growing region in the country. It encompasses eight separate sub-regions that stretch from Wachau in the west to Carnuntum in the east. Make no mistake, Austria is experiencing a quality boom and it has seen a remarkable rise in the overall standards of both red and white wine produced since the mid-late 2000s.

In distinct contrast to all this burgeoning talent and exciting reputation-building; Hungarian wine has been well-known for quite some time. Or rather Tokaji has been. One of the most interesting wine regions in the world, Tokaji has a grand history of wine-making going back more than 500 years. The sweet wines produced here are these days considered to be some of the greatest and most distinctive in the world and rival it’s German and Bordelais counterparts for quality, structure and drinkability.

Portfolio Producers:





Beaujolais

Beaujolais is still in crisis. Many producers are annually forced to leave grapes hanging on the vine, as they gain little or no return to fund the costs of harvesting and producing the wines.

Years of relying on Beaujolais Nouveau and the resulting drop in quality has seen many turn against this once fashionable region, a problem exacerbated by the allure of approachable and consistent New World offerings. Even local popularity has been waning. A high profile court case once saw the Beaujolais Syndicates take on 'Lyon Mag' for publishing deprecatory remarks about the quality of Beaujolais. The Beaujolais Syndicates duly won their case for damages, but a bitter taste has certainly been left in the mouth.

Despite all of the doom and gloom there are some unique, delicious wines being made. The refreshing, ripe fruit of good Beaujolais together with its lightness of touch would seem tailor-made for the modern consumer. The little talked about Beaujolais crus are actually quite varied and the differences are rather interesting. Areas worth exploring include Fleurie, Brouilly and Morgon.

Portfolio Producers:





Bordeaux

Although only separated by some thirty miles; The Medoc and the Right Bank are very different stylistically, historically and culturally.

The Medoc, on the left bank, is dominated by Cabernet plantations and vast, fairytale Castles surrounded by vast, flat vineyards. The Right Bank is a little smaller and favours Merlot. It features much more modest Chateaux or sometimes even no Chateau at all. Bordeaux really is a tale of two river banks.

Portfolio Producers:





Brandy

Our Brandy selection consists of fine liquids from both Armagnac and Cognac. Armagnac is an artisanal product, crafted in small quantities, distilled in pure copper stills, and aged in oak barrels from the local Gascony, Limousin or world renowned Tronçais Forests in Auvergne.

Cognac - Armagnac's more famous, younger, double-distilled cousin - comes from the Charentais, a large area of western France situated immediately north of Bordeaux.

Portfolio Producers:





Burgundy

Burgundy can be viewed in two very separate ways. On the one hand it can be highly complex and sometimes inconsistent, with swings of style from vintage to vintage, not to mention the complex labyrinth of vineyards and producers to choose from. On the other it can be seen as fascinating in its complexity, rewarding in its thrilling quality and, if chosen correctly, have a consistency of quality across vintages whilst retaining each year its own style and identity.

Burgundy is also unique within the wine-growing regions of France in that it exports more of its production than is consumed on the home market. Some 60% leaves the country with over a quarter heading for the UK. Unquestionably we like our Claret in the UK, but it is Burgundy that is showing remarkable growth for Merchants such as ourselves, who specialise in seeking out the established, top quality wine-growers as well as new finds from among the burgeoning number of young Burgundian wine-making talents.

Portfolio Producers:





California

Californian wines are enjoying a tremendous revival, from the top exclusive Estates to the more commercial volume producers. The replanting of most of Californian vineyards in the early-to mid-1990s is starting to bear fruit. The new selected low volume clones grafted onto Phylloxera- resistant rootstock are now of an age to produce grapes that are yielding excellent quality.

The sometimes outrageous prices being demanded, and indeed paid by customers, are a phenomenon of the early 1990s. Prices today are becoming a little more realistic even for the so-called 'boutique' wines.

Portfolio Producers:





Champagne

The UK has been one of the world’s top markets for Champagne for some time. While it is true that overall UK Champagne sales are still dominated the ubiquitous Grand Marques, our own customers seem to be displaying a step change in their approach to the world’s original sparkling wine. For collectors and interested drinkers alike, Champagne is throwing off the shackles of the big (often somewhat predictable) brands. The emergence of boutique houses and individual growers is providing customers with reasons anew to fill their cellars with Champagne; to be collected, aged and celebrated just as they would any other fine wine.

Portfolio Producers:





Germany

"Since the 1997 vintage we have seen a complete revival of Germany’s fortunes as a producer of world-class wine.

Led by the aristocratic Riesling variety and a growing band of first class producers, the country finally seems to be enjoying the recognition it truly deserves. It is a fact that, without exception, the British journalists, sommeliers and trade buyers are some of Riesling’s most loyal and persistent customers, clamouring for wine from the likes of JJ Prum, Fritz Haag, Donnhoff, Keller and Carl von Schubert. This most noble of wines is not only utterly delicious, but in today's modern, fast-moving world of over consumption, these delicate Rieslings are refreshing and light, 'weighing in' at anything between 7.5% to 11.5% alcohol – a great antidote to the more recent trend of overly full-bodied, alcoholic wines. The variety is also greater than ever.

Portfolio Producers:





Italy

The general quality of Italian wine has never been better and, certainly in Piedmont, there has been a succession of great vintages, broken only by the minor blip that was the tumultuous 2002 vintage.

In the UK we seem to be gaining an increasingly insatiable thirst for modern Italian wines. Spearheading the attack is the Piedmontese Nebbiolo grape, in the guise of Barolo, Roero and Barbaresco. The variety is produced in small quantities, needs careful hand tending and has an aromatic subtlety and temperament similar to that of fine Burgundy, from where pioneering growers such as Elio Altare first drew their inspiration.

Portfolio Producers:





Justerini & Brooks House Wines

Putting your own label on a wine requires no small measure of confidence, that the wine you are promoting stands up to the competition and is good enough to bear the company name.

It's for this reason that in recent years we have slimmed down our house selection. It now stands at 6 wines, 3 champagnes and a port. A selection that we feel truly represents the best value, most true to their origin offerings of their particular type.

Portfolio Producers:





Loire

Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé continue to lead the way as France's most sought after Appellations Contrôlées. Their popularity has far outgrown that of the Loire Valley's other regions, and this trend shows no signs of abating. Under the craftsmanship of dedicated, passionate winegrowers like Serge Dagueneau, Lucien Crochet and the young Pinard brothers the reputation of the quality of the region’s wines is in good hands. Both for whites and increasingly for Pinot Noir too.

The viticultural advances and the extreme efforts of many growers the Loire Valley has seen over the last decade have without question sent quality soaring high; this is no more evident than with its red wines. Despite a marginal, northern climate, a good grower can now be expected to make good quality wine almost every vintage.

Portfolio Producers:





Madeira

The fertile land of this beautiful island is host to many varied crops from sugarcane to bananas. The vine, however, is the most important with 400 hundred years of providing Madeira’s main product, wine.

This fortified wine can be made from one of four principal varieties: Sercial,Verdelho, Bual and Malmsey and interestingly it owes much of its fortune to happy accident. The island’s strategic position meant it was a favourite stop off for ships travelling to Africa, South America and India where pipes of Madeira wine would be loaded aboard. Alongside fortification to preserve the fragile still wines, it soon became apparent that the heat of sun on these long tropical journeys had a remarkably positive effect, so much so that before long a fashion had begun for wines to travel to India, and then back again! When growing demand made this solution became impractical the modern Estufa was born, where wines could be artificially heated then cooled again, simulating a journey on the open seas.

The style of the wine slightly depends on each producer but, generally speaking, ranges from dry (Sercial) to sweet (Malmsey). The branded aged bottling from the commercial Madeira houses are good value and offer excellent drinking for a number of different occasions; as aperitifs, with dessert or as after dinner drinks. Vintage Madeira, though, is in a different league. This divine nectar can last with frightening ease for over 150 years without losing any of its youthful freshness.

Portfolio Producers:





New Zealand

The vineyards of New Zealand lie in between the 35º and 45º latitudes, the European equivalent of between Bordeaux and Southern Spain, however the cold, strong prevailing westerly winds from the Pacific make for a cooler overall climate than the figures suggest. Growing vines on the margins can have some spectacular results, notably Rieslings in the Mosel and Chardonnay in Chablis. Nevertheless, it was not until the 1980s that large-scale plantings of quality varieties got underway here.

The whole nation's cultural attitudes changed - Müller-Thurgau was replaced by Sauvignon and was planted on the dry gravely riverbeds of Martinborough and Marlborough. Throughout the 1990s, Pinot Noir vineyards sprouted in all parts of both the North and South islands, from Auckland to Central Otago.

Portfolio Producers:





Oregon

Compared to Napa, Oregon’s Willamette Valley feels like true farming country. Driving through the valley is to drive through agricultural fields, with sporadic timber framed buildings and rusting farm machinery behind white picket fenced yards. It was and still is Mennonite land and was only officially recognised as an AVA in 1983.

The hills, unsurprisingly, are where the vineyards are planted, and these are still to an extent being discovered, mapped and truly understood. There are hundreds of wineries, most of them pretty small in scale, and myriad vineyards ranging in elevation from 300-1000ft with every aspect imaginable.

Portfolio Producers:





Port

The spectacular Douro valley is one of the world’s most breathtaking vineyard areas. The Douro’s origins are in Spain (known there as the ‘Duero’) from where it carves its way through Portugal before finally dispersing into the Atlantic Ocean at Oporto.The vine spreads like a rash over 165 kilometres of its slopes, which are sheer enough to make working on them a fatally dangerous experience

This is why a tasting at any one of the hundreds of Quintas is often interrupted by the thunderous echos of dynamite as men try to blast out rock from the hills, paving the way for more workable terraced vineyards. The prime area of the world’s oldest demarcated wine region (its limits were set in 1756) is known as the Upper Douro, an area east of one the tributaries – the Río Torto. Rainfall is at its lowest and the sun at its strongest here, where the harvest brings in Port’s thickest and sweetest of local grape varieties (these include Touriga Nacional, Tinta Roriz,Touriga Francesca and Tinta Barroca).

Portfolio Producers:





Rest of France

In the last ten years, France's battle with New World wine for shelf space has been most competitively fought by the Languedoc-Roussillon. But now, across the face of this, the most famous, most ubiquitous of wine-producing countries, lies a maze of terroir that lends itself to some truly progressive winemaking, across the board. Growers have adapted to modern trends, producing varietal, fruit- generous wines that seduce new, young consumers.

Situated near Pézenas, Domaine Montrose are the ultimate example of the modern Languedoc Estate, producing carefully made varietally-driven wines of charm and personality. From Cabernet/Syrah to Viognier, their wines ooze ripe, juicy fruit flavours whilst retaining a freshness and balance that make them so drinkable.

Varietals aside, the Languedoc boasts a whole treasure-trove of interesting, great value wines even at the higher end of the price scale. Each year, the region takes giant strides towards realising the potential of its mosaic of soil types and microclimates. Whilst not yet matched by broad demand in the UK, it cannot be much longer that the sheer quality and personality of the region’s wines goes so unnoticed.

Portfolio Producers:





Rhône

France’s wine growing “Rhone Valley” in reality covers two very distinct wine growing regions, separated by a vine-free gap of approximately 30 miles. Whilst the A.O.C. Cotes de Rhone can in theory come from both the North and the South, in practice the two zones produce remarkably distinct wines. By far the greatest volume of wine comes from the flatter rolling hills of the south, home to Chateauneuf-du-Pape and other old favourites like Gigondas, Vacqueras and Lirac, as well as the majority of the ever popular ‘Cotes du Rhone’ .

Blending is the order of the day in the South with Grenache forming the backbone of many cuvees. The late ripening Mouvedre is also common, alongside increasing amounts of Syrah plus Carignan, and Cinsaut (and a few others!). The whites are dominated by Marsanne and Roussanne.

Portfolio Producers:





Sherry

Sherry is a fortified wine made from white grapes that are grown near the city of Jerez de la Frontera in Andalusia. Produced in a variety of styles, Sherry is primarily made from the Palomino grape. It ranges from light versions similar to white table wines, such as Manzanilla and Fino, to darker and heavier versions that have been oxidised and aged in barrel, such as Amontillado and Oloroso. Sweet dessert wines are also made from Pedro Ximenez (a.k.a. PX) or Moscatel grapes, and are sometimes blended with Palomino-based Sherries.

Portfolio Producers:





South Africa

The South African wine industry has come a long way since the end of Apartheid. The surge started with high-volume commercial brands dominating the market – a trend that to some extent still continues today. South Africa’s ability to produce white wine from the ubiquitous Chenin Blanc at a price barely achievable anywhere else in the world has made it one of the top value for money choices in the big grocers. However South Africa has been a victim of its own commercial success, pigeon-holed merely as a producer of low-priced wine. Whilst it does this well, there is far more to it than that.

This breath-taking country is world-renowned for its bio-diversity, home to a myriad of flora and fauna species, and at last we are starting to see this diversity in its winemaking too. In recent years it has started to build a great reputation for its white wines, and slowly but surely, we are starting to see the great potential of its reds. Seen as the halfway house between the ‘new’ and ‘old’ worlds South Africa is capable of producing wines that balance generous, ripe fruit flavours with fresh, invigorating acidities – a combination that is starting to prove a hit.

There is still plenty of untapped potential here, South Africa will no doubt gain great international acclaim for its wines in the years to come as it starts to discover and understand the quality of some of its other wine regions, particularly interesting ones to watch would be the Walker Bay, Hemel-en-Aaarde and Elgin areas south of Stellenbosch near Hermanus.

Portfolio Producers:





Spain & Portugal

The popularity of brand Rioja shows no signs of abating and is single-handedly supporting Spain's stronghold in the UK. However, the last few years have seen the emergence of intelligent, quality-driven producers who have turned their backs on the traditional extended cask ageing, in favour of a shortened rearing in barrel that allows the wine a slower and more even maturation in bottle.

Portugal is some way behind Spain in the popularity stakes however in terms of the rich diversity of its indigenous varieties it can be second only to Italy as a wine producing-country. The Douro valley is placing more emphasis, to great effect, on its red table wines as opposed to just its famed fortified Ports. It is a region to keep a close eye on.

Portfolio Producers:





United Kingdom

English wine is reveling in unprecedented growth. As its reputation improves both domestically and abroad, more vineyards are being planted and existing ones grow older, offering the happy combination of scale and quality.

Although situated at a perilously high latitude, the effects of global warming appear to be, at least in part, benefiting the English in their attempt to produce wine. While wine has been produced here for a long time, often using Germanic and other cool climate grape varieties, the industry really seems to have found its stride in the production of sparkling wine from the traditional Champagne varieties.

Furthermore, the best sites in the south of England are grown on south-facing slopes with chalky soils, not unlike their French counterparts in Champagne, a mere stone throw across the channel.

Portfolio Producers: