La Grande Année, 2007

  Bollinger

A pinot scented nose that bleeds into rich yellow citrus fruits and then piles of crushed chalk. Crammed with crisp red fruit and salt notes, both keenly defined and exceptionally open and inviting – this could be the most immediately enjoyable and accessible young La Grande Année that we can remember. Citrus and red apple notes are bolstered by a chiselled mouse that provides an elevating structural framework for the clear fruit to sit upon. Deep and yet nimble. Immediate enjoyment guaranteed.

Contains Sulphites.

About Bollinger

There are seldom few who are not familiar with the Champagne house, Bollinger. Firmly positioned as a Grande Marques, Bollinger dates back to 1829, when Jacques Bollinger and Paul Renaudin began creating these exquisite and highly traditional wines. The house flourished under the leadership of Madame Lily Bollinger, who often rode her bicycle around the vineyard and was known for remarking when asked about her 1955 Vintage, “I drink it when I’m happy, and when I’m sad. Sometimes I drink it when I’m alone. When I have company I consider it obligatory. I trifle with it if I’m not hungry and drink it when I am. Otherwise I never touch it – unless I’m thirsty.”

Now, her great-nephew, Ghislain de Montgolfier is at the helm. Fermentation takes place in used oak barrels and extended ageing sur lies last between 6 and 9 years prior to disgorging. Doseage is low to ensure balance and finesse, with many wines being riddled by hand, including the simply stunning Grande Annee.

Appellation: Champagne

Champagne is the world's original and most famous region for the production of sparkling wine. A range of styles are produced from the Non-Vintage, through Rose, Vintage and more recently a host of prestige, Vintage luxury cuvees. The three permitted grape varieties are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier.

Grape Blend: Pinot Noir | Chardonnay

Two of the classic Champagne varieties found in a wide variety of blends particularly in prestige cuvées. The Pinot Noir lends finesse and complexity while the Chardonnay provides freshness and aroma.