Corton Clos du Roi, Grand Cru, 2012

  Domaine de Montille

Quite simply the best Clos du Roi that Etienne de Montille has made. Caressing, silky but intense fruit flavours of red and dark berries,
fruit liqueur and griotte cherry. Long, svelte and totally effortless, almost Vosne Grand Cru-like. Stunning. Aged in 50% new oak which,
apart from the Malconsorts, is the highest proportion of new oak in the cellar, yet you don’t notice the oak flavours at all.

Contains Sulphites.

About Domaine de Montille

Etienne is one of Burgundy's great purists, his long-lived wines may need time but they are some of the most honest and terroir-driven wines in Burgundy. The wines are fermented using all or partial whole bunch vinification depending on the vintage, élévage is long and slow in their cold cellars and percentages of new oak are low, rarely more than 50% even for Malconsorts. From some of the most vivid, intense Beaune's there are to perfumed, stylish Volnays and silky Vosnes Romanee, Etienne makes a borad range of some of Burgundy's most polished wines. The Domaine's policy on white wines is to pick as early as possible, as soon as the fruit has just approached ripeness, resulting in tense, fine wines with alcohols rarely more than 13%

Appellation: Corton

Corton is the only red wine Grand Cru in the côte de beaune and covers several vineyards which are known as either Corton or as Corton hyphenated with their individual names, such as Bressandes or Clos du Roi. The style of the wine will depend on exactly where the vines are situated. Corton is an early-ripening area and the Pinot Noir grapes are usually the first to be harvested in the Côte d'Or. The vast majority of white wine that comes from the hill of Corton is Corton-Charlemagne though there is a miniscule amount of white Corton made.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.